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Chicken MDM – Mechanically Deboned Meat

Chicken MDM stands for “Mechanically Deboned Meat.” It is a type of poultry meat product that is produced using a mechanical process to separate the remaining meat from the bones and carcass after the primary cuts (such as breasts, thighs, and wings) have been removed.

The process of obtaining MDM involves passing the chicken carcass through machines that scrape and press the remaining meat from the bones, cartilage, and connective tissues. The resulting product is a fine, paste-like substance that contains a mixture of meat, some bone particles, and collagen.

MDM is commonly used in the food industry as an ingredient in various processed meat products, such as sausages, nuggets, patties, and canned products. It is particularly useful for its ability to improve the texture, juiciness, and binding properties of processed meats. Because MDM includes some bone material and connective tissues, it has a higher collagen content, which helps enhance the overall moisture and gelatinous characteristics of the final product.

While MDM serves a valuable purpose in the food industry for its functionality and cost-effectiveness, it’s essential to understand that it is not a whole-cut meat product. Due to the mechanical process used, MDM may have a different appearance and texture compared to intact chicken meat.

For consumers who prefer whole-cut chicken meat, it’s important to check the product label and choose items that explicitly state they contain “100% chicken breast” or “100% chicken meat” if they wish to avoid MDM or other mechanically separated meat products.

As with any processed food, moderation is key, and it’s always a good idea to choose a balanced diet that includes a variety of whole foods, including fresh cuts of poultry and other meats, along with fruits, vegetables, and whole grains.

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